Thoughts on "Worthy Of My Song" by Phil Wickham

Phil Wickham’s Worthy of My Song is a powerful declaration of God’s worth and goodness through every season.

While the meaning of the song is clear, there are moments Wickham references that might make you think twice about introducing it in a congregationals context, but these moments are an opportunity to pour even more meaning into the song.

First, let's look at the lyrics for Worthy Of My Song by Phil Wickham

I'm gonna sing 'til my heart starts changing Oh, I'm gonna worship 'til I mean every word 'Cause the way I feel and the fear I'm facing Doesn't change who You are or what You deserve

I give You my worship You still deserve it You're worthy, You're worthy You're worthy of my song I'll pour out Your praises In blessing and breaking You're worthy, You're worthy You're worthy of my song

I'm gonna live like my King is risen Gonna preach to my soul that You've already won And even though I can't see it, I'm gonna keep believing That every promise You make is as good as done

I give You my worship You still deserve it You're worthy, You're worthy You're worthy of my song I'll pour out Your praises In blessing and breaking You're worthy, You're worthy Jesus, You're worthy of my song

When I sat by that hospital bed, You were worthy And she could barely lift her head, You were worthy After all those tears were shed, You were worthy I'll never stop singing Your praise I'll never stop singing Your praise

And in the blessing, in the pain, You are worthy Whether You say yes or no or wait, You are worthy Through it all, I choose to say, "You are worthy" I'll never stop singing Your praise No, I'll never stop singing Your praise

And when I finally see Your face, I'll cry worthy And when You wipe these tears away, I'll cry worthy Above every other name, You are worthy I'll never stop singing Your praise No, I'll never stop singing Your praise

The lyrics on the bridge are clearly recalling a very specific experience and to sing such intimate lyrics could feel disingenuous in a congregational context. So how should we approach it? Fortunately Wickham, I think very intentionally, gives us a clear path. While the first time through the bridge is very intimate and specific, the next time through brings it back to an expression that is true for all of us.

From a musical standpoint, you can use that first time through as free worship or even better to call out a specific experience that your congregation experienced together. “When Beth was told it was cancer You were worthy. When this old church basement flooded You were worthy. Reminding our community of trials experienced together can both bond the group together and add so much more meaning to the song.

My guess is whatever experience Wickham is referring to brought so much meaning to him as he wrote the song that he needed to include it. What an opportunity this song gives us to do the same.

You can learn to play Worthy Of My Song and over 600 songs on guitar, bass, drums, keys and vocals on Worship Artistry.

Jason Houtsma is the co-founder and guitar teacher at Worship Artistry, where he is helping musicians of every level answer the call to worship with passion and confidence. Jason has been leading worship and writing music since he was 15 years old and currently serves as Worship Pastor for Mosaic Church in Bellingham, WA. He is husband to Alli and father to Bjorn and Asher.

Thoughts on "Worthy Of My Song" by Phil Wickham

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